Ludington Hospital celebrates certified nurses

March 17, 2023

Ginger Allison demonstrates new emergency department equipment at a team training event last year. Allison is one of 47 Ludington Hospital nurses with specialty RN certification.

Ludington Hospital celebrates certified nurses

LUDINGTON — Certified Nurses Day is March 19, a day when nurses with certification credentials are recognized for their extra effort in additional learning and educational endeavors. Corewell Health’s Spectrum Health Ludington Hospital has 47 nurses with certifications over and above their registered nurse credential.

“I am extremely proud of our certified nurses,” said chief nursing officer Meleah Mariani, who is one of the 47 certified nurses. “Registered nurse specialty certification is a hallmark of excellence. It is a sign of continuous learning, continuous advancement, and continuous improvement. It shows a desire to practice at the top of one’s license, and I’m grateful to our nurses who put in that extra effort.”

One of the certified nurses at the Ludington Hospital is Ginger Allison. She received her ‘Certified Emergency Nurse’ credential 30 years ago in 1993 from the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing (BCEN). She was just recertified in early November of last year. Recertifications last four years and involve taking a competency-based exam or acquiring 100 continuing credit hours.

“Obtaining a nursing certification from a professional organization demonstrates commitment to be your very best,” said Allison. “I went for my CEN credential to validate that I had the knowledge needed to care for emergency department patients and to help keep patients safe. It’s a way to stay current in your knowledge and shows employers that you take your nursing career seriously. I encourage anyone to go after a certification. Schedule the exam, study for it and quiz yourself. Go in prepared and do your best. It will be worth it!”

A veteran nurse, Allison has worked at the Ludington Hospital since 1997, working in the emergency department and as a nurse educator. She received her undergraduate degree from Southwestern Michigan College and her master’s degree in nursing from the University of Phoenix. She was inspired to go into nursing after the cardiac arrest of a neighbor when none of the bystanders knew what to do before the ambulance arrived.

She enjoys the flexibility of nursing and the option to choose different aspects, whether working at the bedside of patients, supervising other nurses in the workplace, educating new nurses, working in an emergency department or at West Shore Community College as an adjunct nursing professor or teaching classes.

“There are rewards wherever you look,” she stated. “It’s the people you help that inspire you and move you forward.”

 

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